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Kate Grenville

Author

1/16: How filmmaking has influenced the writing process  

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Kate Grenville

Author

2/16: Collaborating with Sue Wolfe

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Kate Grenville

Author

3/16: Demonstrating some editing techniques

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Kate Grenville

Author

4/16: Collecting images and objects to give writing tactility

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Kate Grenville

Author

5/16: Sketches help connect the story to the setting

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Kate Grenville

Author

6/16: The path to becoming a writer

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Kate Grenville

Author

7/16: Best moments for work are early in the morning

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Kate Grenville

Author

8/16: Take inspiration from what's around you

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Kate Grenville

Author

9/16: Giving ideas time : being solitary and silent

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Kate Grenville

Author

10/16: Overcoming writers block with art and music

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Kate Grenville

Author

11/16: Musical structure and performance is relevant to writing

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Kate Grenville

Author

12/16: Making time for spontaneity and documentation  

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Kate Grenville

Author

13/16: Reading Patrick White and Elizabeth Taylor

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Kate Grenville

Author

14/16: Sharing knowledge about creative process

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Kate Grenville

Author

15/16: The multitude of drafts produced before editing begins

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Kate Grenville

Author

16/16: Finding problems to solve and making lists

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KateGrenville

Guest of the†Melbourne Writers Festival 2011
 

With four instructional works on creative writing published alongside bestselling works of fiction, Kate Grenville†is in a stronger position than most to talk about her creative process.

Whilst she is disciplined in documenting and reflecting on her process, Kate is also open to spontaneous inspiration. Like Carolyn Steel, she will use whatever materials are at hand to make notes or sketches - be that a paper bag, cardboard box or Aspirin packet. The memory of a conversation can be useful, but itís often a small detail or key word than is needed to break the cycle of writerís block.

Sketches, photographs, notes and objects take on special significance in her research. Collecting brickwork, stones and artefacts might be a vaguely superstitious way of researching, but itís one that allows her to get a physical grasp on her writing.

Grenvilleís novels respond to the monopolisation of history, covering the terrain between fiction and memoir with strongly subjective and often tactile prose. Works like The Secret River are private endeavours with a public aspiration: our culture needs to look at how we evolved in order to understand present-day relations.

 

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